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Long-term course after initial iron removal of iron excess in patients with dysmetabolic iron overload syndrome.

Abstract : Initial venesection therapy in dysmetabolic iron overload syndrome (DIOS) was shown to improve insulin resistance. However, no data are available on the long-term outcome of iron store, thus questioning the relevance of maintenance therapy. The aim of the study was to describe the long-term evolution of iron overload after successful iron removal in patients with DIOS. Patients diagnosed with DIOS from 1998 to 2003 and having completed venesection therapy were proposed an outpatient visit in 2009. Inclusion criteria were as follows: confirmation of the DIOS diagnosis, absence of iron-related treatment or bloodletting since the end of the initial venesection treatment, at least 2 years of follow-up since last phlebotomy. Clinical and biological data were recorded at diagnosis and at inclusion. A total of 58 patients were included. The mean liver iron content at diagnosis was 80±43 µmol/g and the mean amount of iron removed was 2.2±1.2 g. The mean follow-up time was 71±23 months since end of treatment. At inclusion, 64% of patients had recurrence of iron overload. Serum ferritin at diagnosis was the only parameter associated with recurrence of iron overload. In patients with DIOS, the course of iron loading after initial iron removal supports periodical follow-up to detect those patients with recurrence of iron overload who could benefit from maintenance therapy.
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https://hal-univ-rennes1.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-01128196
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Submitted on : Monday, March 9, 2015 - 1:57:48 PM
Last modification on : Thursday, June 18, 2020 - 9:29:14 AM

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Edouard Bardou-Jacquet, Fabrice Lainé, Jeff Morcet, Michèle Perrin, Dominique Guyader, et al.. Long-term course after initial iron removal of iron excess in patients with dysmetabolic iron overload syndrome.. European Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins, 2014, 26 (4), pp.418-21. ⟨10.1097/MEG.0000000000000058⟩. ⟨hal-01128196⟩

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