Skip to Main content Skip to Navigation
Conference papers

Art and gender. The case study of enamelling in continental Europe (4th-3rd century BCE)

Abstract : Fourth century BCE works of art from south-western Germany and the Swiss Plateau are characterised by the Waldalgesheim style and the art of enamelling. Special classes of jewels and weapons indicate that the art of enamelling was a symbol of excellence at that time. The spatial distribution of early enamelled objects shows a high concentration in the middle and upper Rhine valley. Anthropological data and DNA analysis available from a few cemeteries – such as Gäufelden-Nebringen, Baden-Württemberg, Germany – provide information about the relationships between types of enamelled objects, as well as the people and family groups to whom these objects were dedicated. These data offer an opportunity to investigate issues of gender during the 4th century and the early 3rd century BCE in continental Europe.
Complete list of metadatas

https://hal-univ-rennes1.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-01982877
Contributor : Catherine Gorlini <>
Submitted on : Wednesday, January 16, 2019 - 9:29:30 AM
Last modification on : Thursday, March 12, 2020 - 3:28:01 PM

Identifiers

  • HAL Id : hal-01982877, version 1

Citation

Virginie Defente. Art and gender. The case study of enamelling in continental Europe (4th-3rd century BCE). International Workshop, Gender Transformations in Prehistoric and Archaic Societies, Mar 2018, Kiel, Germany. pp.403-415. ⟨hal-01982877⟩

Share

Metrics

Record views

42