Substitution of unsaturated lipid chains by thioether-containing lipid chains in cationic amphiphiles: physicochemical consequences and application for gene delivery - Archive ouverte HAL Access content directly
Journal Articles Organic & Biomolecular Chemistry Year : 2019

Substitution of unsaturated lipid chains by thioether-containing lipid chains in cationic amphiphiles: physicochemical consequences and application for gene delivery

(1) , (1) , (2) , (3) , (3, 4) , (1) , (1) , (2) , (2) , (1)
1
2
3
4
Véronique Vie

Abstract

The hydrophobic moiety of cationic amphiphiles plays an important role in the transfection process because its structure has an impact on both the type of the supramolecular assembly and the dynamic properties of these assemblies. The latter have to exhibit a compromise between stability and instability to efficiently compact then deliver DNA into target cells. In the present work, we report the synthesis of new cationic amphiphiles featuring a thioether function at different positions of two 18-atom length lipid chains and we study their physicochemical properties (anisotropy of fluorescence and compression isotherms) with analogues possessing either oleyl (C181) or stearyl (C180) chains. We show that the fluidity of cationic lipids featuring a thioether function located close to the middle of each lipid chain is intermediate between that of oleyl- and stearyl-containing analogues. These properties are also supported by the compression isotherm assays. When used as carriers to deliver a plasmid DNA, thioether-containing cationic amphiphiles demonstrate a good ability to transfect human-derived cell lines, with those incorporating such a moiety in the middle of the chain being the most efficient. This work supports the use of a thioether function as a possible alternative to unsaturation in aliphatic lipid chains of cationic amphiphiles to modulate physicochemical behaviours and in turn biological activities such as gene delivery ability.
La partie hydrophobe des composés amphiphiles joue un rôle important lors des processus de transfection puisque sa structure influence l’assemblage supramoléculaire et la dynamique de ces assemblages. Cette dynamique doit être un compromis entre stabilité et instabilité pour compacter et apporter l’ADN jusqu’aux cellules cibles. Dans cette étude, nous décrivons la synthèse de nouveaux amphiphiles cationiques comportant une fonction thioéther à différente position d’une chaine contenant dans son squelette 18 atomes. Nous rapportons également leurs propriétés physico-chimiques et comparons les résultats avec des amphiphiles comportant une chaine insaturée (chaine oleyle) ou saturée (chaine stéaryle). Nous montrons que la fluidité des assemblages supramoléculaires des amphiphiles comportant une fonction thioéther proche du milieu de chaine est intermédiaire à celle des composés possédant une chaine oleyles et stéaryle. Ces résultats sont aussi en accord avec les résultats des isothermes de compression. Ces nouveaux amphiphiles ont été utilisés en transfection et montrent de très bonnes efficacités pour les composés où la fonction thioéther se trouve proche du milieu de la chaine lipidique. Ce travail montre que ce nouveau type de chaine lipidique présente une alternative à l’utilisation des chaines mono-insaturée (oleyle) pour la conception de composés amphiphiles utilisés ici pour la transfection
Fichier principal
Vignette du fichier
Bouraoui et al_Substitution of unsaturated lipid chains_accepted.pdf (398.99 Ko) Télécharger le fichier
Origin : Files produced by the author(s)
Loading...

Dates and versions

hal-02088106 , version 1 (14-06-2019)

Identifiers

Cite

Amal Bouraoui, Mathieu Berchel, Rosy Ghanem, Véronique Vie, Gilles Paboeuf, et al.. Substitution of unsaturated lipid chains by thioether-containing lipid chains in cationic amphiphiles: physicochemical consequences and application for gene delivery. Organic & Biomolecular Chemistry, 2019, 17 (14), pp.3609-3616. ⟨10.1039/c9ob00473d⟩. ⟨hal-02088106⟩
221 View
154 Download

Altmetric

Share

Gmail Facebook Twitter LinkedIn More