Skip to Main content Skip to Navigation
Journal articles

Quantifying Sources of Variability in Infancy Research Using the Infant-Directed-Speech Preference

Michael Frank 1 Katherine Jane Alcock 2 Natalia Arias-Trejo 3 Gisa Aschersleben 4 Dare Baldwin 5 Stéphanie Barbu 6 Elika Bergelson 7 Christina Bergmann 8 Alexis Black 9 Ryan Blything 10 Maximilian Böhland 11 Petra Bolitho 12 Arielle Borovsky 13 Shannon Brady 14 Bettina Braun 15 Anna Brown 16 Krista Byers-Heinlein 17 Linda Campbell 18 Cara Cashon 19 Mihye Choi 20 Joan Christodoulou 14 Laura Cirelli 21 Stefania Conte 22 Sarah Cordes 23 Christopher Cox 24 Alejandrina Cristia 25 Rhodri Cusack 26 Catherine Davies 27 Maartje de Klerk 28 Claire Delle Luche 29 Laura de Ruiter 30 Dhanya Dinakar 31 Kate Dixon 19 Virginie Durier 6 Samantha Durrant 16 Christopher Fennell 32 Brock Ferguson 33 Alissa Ferry 30 Paula Fikkert 34 Teresa Flanagan 35 Caroline Floccia 36 Megan Foley 37 Tom Fritzsche 38 Rebecca Frost 8 Anja Gampe 39 Judit Gervain 40 Nayeli González-Gómez 41 Anna Gupta 42 Laura Hahn 34 J. Kiley Hamlin 43 Erin Hannon 44 Naomi Havron 25 Jessica Hay 45 Mikołaj Hernik 46 Barbara Höhle 38 Derek Houston 47 Lauren Howard 35 Mitsuhiko Ishikawa 48 Shoji Itakura 48 Iain Jackson 30 Krisztina Jakobsen 49 Marianna Jarto 50 Scott Johnson 14 Caroline Junge 28 Didar Karadag 51 Natalia Kartushina 52 Danielle Kellier 1 Tamar Keren-Portnoy 24 Kelsey Klassen 53 Melissa Kline 54 Eon-Suk Ko 55 Jonathan Kominsky 56 Jessica Kosie 5 Haley Kragness 57 Andrea Krieger 58 Florian Krieger 59 Jill Lany 60 Roberto Lazo 61 Michelle Lee 62 Chloé Leservoisier 6 Claartje Levelt 42 Casey Lew-Williams 63 Matthias Lippold 64 Ulf Liszkowski 50 Liquan Liu 31 Steven Luke 65 Rebecca Lundwall 65 Viola Macchi Cassia 22 Nivedita Mani 64 Caterina Marino 40 Alia Martin 12 Meghan Mastroberardino 17 Victoria Mateu 14 Julien Mayor 52 Katharina Menn 34 Christine Michel 66 Yusuke Moriguchi 48 Benjamin Morris 67 Karli Nave 44 Thierry Nazzi 40 Claire Noble 16 Miriam Novack 68 Nonah Olesen 19 Adriel Orena 69 Mitsuhiko Ota 70 Robin Panneton 71 Sara Parvanezadeh Esfahani 45 Markus Paulus 72 Carolina Pletti 72 Linda Polka 69 Christine Potter 63 Hugh Rabagliati 70 Shruthilaya Ramachandran 73 Jennifer Rennels 44 Greg Reynolds 45 Kelly Roth 45 Charlotte Rothwell 2 Doroteja Rubez 47 Yana Ryjova 44 Jenny Saffran 74 Ayumi Sato 75 Sophie Savelkouls 23 Adena Schachner 62 Graham Schafer 76 Melanie Schreiner 77 Amanda Seidl 13 Mohinish Shukla 20 Elizabeth A. Simpson 61 Leher Singh 73 Barbora Skarabela 70 Gaye Soley 51 Megha Sundara 14 Anna Theakston 30 Abbie Thompson 60 Laurel Trainor 57 Sandra Trehub 21 Anna Trøan 52 Angeline Sin-Mei Tsui 32 Katherine Twomey 30 Katie von Holzen 40 Yuanyuan Wang 47 Sandra Waxman 68 Janet Werker 43 Stephanie Wermelinger 39 Alix Woolard 18 Daniel Yurovsky 67 Katharina Zahner 15 Martin Zettersten 74 Melanie Soderstrom 53
Abstract : Psychological scientists have become increasingly concerned with issues related to methodology and replicability, and infancy researchers in particular face specific challenges related to replicability: For example, high-powered studies are difficult to conduct, testing conditions vary across labs, and different labs have access to different infant populations. Addressing these concerns, we report on a large-scale, multisite study aimed at (a) assessing the overall replicability of a single theoretically important phenomenon and (b) examining methodological, cultural, and developmental moderators. We focus on infants’ preference for infant-directed speech (IDS) over adult-directed speech (ADS). Stimuli of mothers speaking to their infants and to an adult in North American English were created using seminaturalistic laboratory-based audio recordings. Infants’ relative preference for IDS and ADS was assessed across 67 laboratories in North America, Europe, Australia, and Asia using the three common methods for measuring infants’ discrimination (head-turn preference, central fixation, and eye tracking). The overall meta-analytic effect size (Cohen’s d) was 0.35, 95% confidence interval = [0.29, 0.42], which was reliably above zero but smaller than the meta-analytic mean computed from previous literature (0.67). The IDS preference was significantly stronger in older children, in those children for whom the stimuli matched their native language and dialect, and in data from labs using the head-turn preference procedure. Together, these findings replicate the IDS preference but suggest that its magnitude is modulated by development, native-language experience, and testing procedure.
Complete list of metadatas

Cited literature [102 references]  Display  Hide  Download

https://hal-univ-rennes1.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-02509817
Contributor : Umr6552 Ethos <>
Submitted on : Thursday, March 19, 2020 - 12:27:38 PM
Last modification on : Friday, September 25, 2020 - 3:46:02 PM

File

ManyBabies1RRProtocolRevision2...
Files produced by the author(s)

Identifiers

Citation

Michael Frank, Katherine Jane Alcock, Natalia Arias-Trejo, Gisa Aschersleben, Dare Baldwin, et al.. Quantifying Sources of Variability in Infancy Research Using the Infant-Directed-Speech Preference. Advances in Methods and Practices in Psychological Science, [Thousand Oaks]: [SAGE Publications], 2020, pp.251524591990080. ⟨10.1177/2515245919900809⟩. ⟨hal-02509817⟩

Share

Metrics

Record views

372

Files downloads

925