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Snake, copper and water in south-eastern Arabian religion during the Iron Age: the Bithnah and Masāfi evidence. In British Foundation for the Study of Arabia

Abstract : Excavations of two Iron Age cultic sites at Bithnah and Masāfī (Fujairah, United Arab Emirates) have provided data documenting cultic rituals dedicated to a divinity represented as a snake practised by south-eastern Arabian populations during the Iron Age (1200-300 BC). On the basis of archaeological data as well as of fi rst results obtained by chemical studies, a possible connection between the attributions of the deity represented by the snake and the regional economic background, in which copper and water might have played a major rule is discussed by the authors.
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https://hal-univ-rennes1.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-02559741
Contributor : Cécile Le Carlier de Veslud <>
Submitted on : Thursday, April 30, 2020 - 5:17:30 PM
Last modification on : Wednesday, August 5, 2020 - 3:11:39 AM

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  • HAL Id : hal-02559741, version 1

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Anne Benoist, Cécile Le Carlier de Veslud, Julie Goy, Michele Degli Esposti, Barbara Armbruster, et al.. Snake, copper and water in south-eastern Arabian religion during the Iron Age: the Bithnah and Masāfi evidence. In British Foundation for the Study of Arabia. Mounir Arbach and Jérémie Schiettecatte. Pre-Islamic South Arabia and its Neigbours : New Developments of Research. Proceedings of the 17th Rencontres Sabéennes held in Paris, 6-8 June 2013, 2740, pp.21-36, 2015, BAR International Series, 9781407313993. ⟨hal-02559741⟩

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